Amîs di Crist – Przyjaciele Chrystusa

No ducj chei che a mi disin: Signôr, Signôr, a jentraran tal ream dai cîi, ma chel che al fâs la volontât dal Pari gno che al è tai cîi. E chest, parcè che al è facil di clamâ il non dal Signôr, ma dificil di fâ la sô volontât. La tiere e je plene di int che lôr a scjampin vie denant di cualsisedi … Continue reading Amîs di Crist – Przyjaciele Chrystusa

Simile est regnum caelorum thesauro abscondito in agro

At Matthew 13:44, Jesus tells such parable (version Douay): The kingdom of heaven is like unto a treasure hidden in a field. Which a man having found, hid it; and for joy thereof goeth and selleth all that he hath and buyeth that field. This entry will examine the first sentence of the parable in Latin, Polish and Friulian versions, with the entirety thereof provided … Continue reading Simile est regnum caelorum thesauro abscondito in agro

Prope est dies Domini

This entry will examine the Latin, Polish and Friulian equivalents of the wording the day of the Lord is near; such words can be found at Isaiah 13:6. Latin. Prope est dies Domini. The Latin prope means near, nigh. The third-person singular est is the Latin equivalent of is. As for the day of the Lord, the Latin is dies Domini, where Domini (of the … Continue reading Prope est dies Domini

Quis fecit os hominis?

Moses, at Exodus 4, in shrinking before the Lord in the mission given him, uses as pretext his lack of eloquence, his slowness of tongue. The Lord, for whom nothing is impossible, puts forth to Moses the following question (version Douay-Rheims): Who made man’s mouth? This entry will examine the words of the Lord in Latin, Polish and Friulian versions. Latin: Quis fecit os hominis? … Continue reading Quis fecit os hominis?

Vade Satana

Matthew 4 recounts the temptation of Jesus by the devil. At the climax of the temptation, He says to the devil: begone, Satan (version Douay-Rheims). This entry will look at the Latin, Polish and Friulian readings of these words of Christ. Latin: Vade Satana. The Latin infinitive vadere means to go. As for vade, found in the words of Jesus, this is a second-person singular … Continue reading Vade Satana

On the Friulian imperative (conjugation I verbs)

This entry will examine how the imperative of Friulian verbs of the first conjugation is formed. First conjugation verbs are those whose infinitive ends in -â, for instance, fevelâ (to speak), cjaminâ (to walk), cjapâ (to take). The formation of the imperative of verbs of the second, third and fourth conjugations must be dealt with in subsequent entries. Related reading: Formation of the negated Friulian … Continue reading On the Friulian imperative (conjugation I verbs)

Nemo potest duobus dominis servire

At Matthew 6:24, Jesus says (version Douay-Rheims): No man can serve two masters. For either he will hate the one, and love the other: or he will sustain the one, and despise the other. You cannot serve God and mammon. This entry will look at the Latin, Polish and Friulian readings of Christ’s words no man can serve two masters. Latin: Nemo potest duobus dominis … Continue reading Nemo potest duobus dominis servire