Vade Satana

Matthew 4 recounts the temptation of Jesus by the devil. At the climax of the temptation, He says to the devil: begone, Satan (version Douay-Rheims). This entry will look at the Latin, Polish and Friulian readings of these words of Christ.

Latin: Vade Satana. The Latin infinitive vadere means to go. As for vade, found in the words of Jesus, this is a second-person singular imperative meaning go {thou}; for information, this is in contrast to the second-person plural imperative vadite, meaning go {you}. The Latin for Satan is the masculine noun Satanas; however, in the words of Christ, we find the form Satana. For Jesus addresses Satan directly by these His words, the nominative Satanas must fall into vocative position: Satana. Wherefore: Vade Satana (go, Satan).

Polish: Idź precz, szatanie. The Polish adverb precz is equivalent to the English away. The imperfective verb iść means to go. As for idź, found in the words of Jesus, this is a second-person singular imperative meaning go {thou}; for information, this is in contrast to the second-person plural imperative idźcie, meaning go {you}. Idź precz, then, is a second-person singular imperative meaning go {thou} away. The Polish for Satan is the masculine noun szatan; however, in the words of Christ, we find the form szatanie. For Jesus addresses Satan directly by these His words, the nominative szatan must fall into vocative position: szatanie. Wherefore: Idź precz, szatanie (go away, Satan).

Friulian: Va vie di chi, satane. The Friulian adverb vie is equivalent to the English away. The infinitive means to go. Of lâ, an irregular verb, the second-person singular imperative form is va, meaning go {thou}; for information, this is in contrast to the second-person plural imperative lait, meaning go {you}. The second-person plural imperative may also take the form vait; however, lait is the form preferred in the Bible. Va vie, then, found in the words of Christ, is a second-person singular imperative meaning go {thou} away. Di chi is Friulian for from here, otherwise expressed in English as hence, given that di means from and chi means here. The masculine noun satane is Friulian for Satan. Wherefore: Va vie di chi, satane (go away hence, Satan).

The reader will find below the text of Matthew 4:10 in Latin, Polish and Friulian versions.

Latin (Biblia Vulgata): Tunc dicit ei Iesus: Vade Satana: Scriptum est enim: Dominum Deum tuum adorabis, et illi soli servies.

Polish (Biblia Tysiąclecia): Na to odrzekł mu Jezus: «Idź precz, szatanie! Jest bowiem napisane: Panu, Bogu swemu, będziesz oddawał pokłon i Jemu samemu służyć będziesz».

Friulian (Bibie par un popul): Alore Jesù i disè: “Va vie di chi, satane! Al è scrit: Tu adorarâs il Signôr to Diu e tu ti inzenoglarâs dome denant di lui”.