Prope est dies Domini

This entry will examine the Latin, Polish and Friulian equivalents of the wording the day of the Lord is near; such words can be found at Isaiah 13:6.

Latin. Prope est dies Domini. The Latin prope means near, nigh. The third-person singular est is the Latin equivalent of is. As for the day of the Lord, the Latin is dies Domini, where Domini (of the Lord) is the form taken by Dominus (the Lord) in the genitive. Consider: dies (the day); Dominus (the Lord); Domini (of the Lord); dies Domini (the day of the Lord). Wherefore: Prope est dies Domini (the day of the Lord is near [near is the day of the Lord]).

Polish. Bliski jest dzień Pański. The Polish bliski means near, nigh. The third-person singular jest is the Polish equivalent of is. As for the day of the Lord, the Polish is dzień Pański; however, the reader is to understand that Pański is an adjective, whence the Lordly day for literal translation of dzień Pański. This use of the adjective occurs frequently in the Polish version of the Holy Scripture, for instance: imię Pańskie (the name of the Lord [the Lordly name]); Anioł Pański (the Angel of the Lord [the Lordly Angel]). Wherefore: Bliski jest dzień Pański (the day of the Lord is near [near is the Lordly day]).

Friulian. La zornade dal Signôr e je dongje. The Friulian dongje means near, nigh. As for the noun zornade, this is the Friulian for day; this noun is feminine singular and serves as the subject of the sentence, whence the feminine, third-person singular e je for equivalent of the English is. Had the subject been a masculine singular noun, the verb form would have been the masculine, third-person singular al è. Consider: la zornade e je (the day is); la femine e je (the woman is); la tiere e je (the earth is); Diu al è (God is); l’om al è (the man is); il re al è (the king is). The Friulian for the Lord is il Signôr; for of the Lord, the Friulian, then, is dal Signôr. Wherefore: La zornade dal Signôr e je dongje (the day of the Lord is near).