Vocatum est nomen eius Iesus

At Luke 2:26, we read that Jesus receives His name when eight days were accomplished for His circumcising. This entry will examine the Latin, Polish and Friulian readings of His name was called Jesus.

Latin. Vocatum est nomen eius Iesus. The Latin present infinitive vocare means to call, with its lemma form voco (I call), first-person singular of the present indicative. As for vocatum (called), found in the text of this verse, this is the perfect passive participle, nominative neuter singular, of the same verb. It is neuter singular in form, that it should accord with the neuter singular noun nomen, meaning name. Consider the following, all of which mean was called, third-person singular: vocatus est (masculine); vocatum est (neuter); vocata est (feminine). Eius is Latin for his. The name of Jesus takes the form Iesus in Latin. Wherefore: Vocatum est nomen eius Iesus (His name was called Jesus).

Polish. Nadano Mu imię Jezus. The Polish perfective verb nadać means to confer; from this comes the impersonal past form nadano (one conferred, one did confer). The Polish for name is the neuter noun imię; it is here found in accusative position. The dative mu means unto him. In Polish, the name of Jesus takes the form Jezus. Consider: nadano (one conferred) Mu (unto Him) imię (the name) Jezus (Jesus). The impersonal past form nadano (one conferred, one did confer) can be made to align with the English passive voice. Wherefore: Nadano Mu imię Jezus (conferred unto Him was the name Jesus).

Friulian. I meterin il non di Jesù. The Friulian for name is the masculine noun non, whence il non di Jesù for Friulian equivalent of the English the name of Jesus. The reader will note that Friulian also knows the form Gjesù for the name of Jesus, which was used in an earlier version of the Bible. The Friulian infinitive meti means to put; in this way, meti il non di Jesù means to put the name of Jesus, which is to say, to confer the name of Jesus. In the simple past, meti takes the form a meterin in the third-person plural, meaning they put, they did put. Of meti, such is the simple past: o metei (I put, I did put; first-person singular); tu meteris (thou puttest, thou didst put; second-person singular); al metè (he/it put, he/it did put; masculine, third-person singular); e metè (she/it put, she/it did put; feminine, third-person singular); o meterin (we put, we did put; first-person plural); o meteris (you put, you did put; second-person plural); a meterin (they put, they did put; third-person plural). Consider now the following: a meterin il non di Jesù (they put the name of Jesus); i meterin il non di Jesù (unto Him they put the name of Jesus). From the foregoing two instances, the reader will note that i (unto him) replaces the atonic, third-person plural a. The reader will moreover note that this use of the Friulian third-person plural can be made to align with the English passive voice. Wherefore: I meterin il non di Jesù (unto Him was put the name of Jesus).