Sitio

Examined in this entry are the Latin, Polish and Friulian readings of I thirst, such being the fifth of the seven final words of Jesus on the cross, pronounced at John 19:28.

Latin. Sitio. The first-person singular and present indicative sitio means I thirst, from the present infinitive sitire (to thirst). Following is the present indicative of this verb: sitio (I thirst; first-person singular); sitis (thou thirstest; second-person singular); sitit (he/she/it thirsteth; third-person singular); sitimus (we thirst; first-person plural); sititis (you thirst; second-person plural); sitiunt (they thirst; third-person plural). Related to this, for information, is the present infinitive esurire, meaning to hunger. The present indicative of this verb follows: esurio (I hunger; first-person singular); esuris (thou hungerest; second-person singular); esurit (he/she/it hungereth; third-person singular); esurimus (we hunger; first-person plural); esuritis (you hunger; second-person plural); esuriunt (they hunger; third-person plural). — In conclusion, spoken by Jesus on the cross was sitio, meaning I thirst.

Polish. Pragnę. The first-person singular and present tense pragnę means I thirst; the infinitive in question is the imperfective pragnąć, meaning to thirst and which, in this sense, is an archaic usage. A non-archaic Polish equivalent is chce mi się pić (I am thirsty; literally, chce [it is wanting] mi [unto me] się pić [to drink]). Of the imperfective pragnąć, following is the present tense: pragnę (I thirst; first-person singular); pragniesz (thou thirstest; second-person singular); pragnie (he/she/it thirsteth; third-person singular); pragniemy (we thirst; first-person plural); pragniecie (you thirst; second-person plural); pragną (they thirst; third-person plural). Related to this, for information, is the neuter noun pragnienie, meaning thirst. For instance, at Exodus 17:3, we encounter (version Biblia Tysiąclecia) śmierć z pragnienia, meaning death by thirst (literally, death from thirst). — In conclusion, spoken by Jesus on the cross was pragnę, meaning I thirst.

Friulian. O ài sêt. The first-person singular, present indicative o ài means I have, from the infinitive (to have). Following is the present indicative of this verb: o ài (I have; first-person singular); tu âs (thou hast; second-person singular); al à (he/it hath; masculine, third-person singular); e à (she/it hath; feminine, third-person singular); o vin (we have; first-person plural); o vês (you have; second-person plural); a àn (they have; third-person plural). As for sêt, this is a feminine noun meaning thirst. In this way, the Friulian equivalent of to thirst or to be thirsty is vê sêt (literally, to have thirst). Related to this, for information, is the feminine noun fam, so that to hunger or to be hungry is expressed in Friulian vê fam (literally, to have hunger). Examples: tu âs sêt (thou thirstest, thou art thirsty [thou hast thirst]); o vin sêt (we thirst, we are thirsty [we have thirst]); o ài fam (I hunger, I am hungry [I have hunger]); a àn fam (they hunger, they are hungry [they have hunger]). — In conclusion, spoken by Jesus on the cross was o ài sêt, meaning I thirst or I am thirsty (literally, I have thirst).