Domine, exaudi orationem meam

From the first verse of Psalms 143 (142): Hear, O Lord, my prayer (version Douay). Below are examined the Latin, Polish and Friulian readings of the same.

Latin. Domine, exaudi orationem meam. The masculine noun Dominus (nominative) is Latin for Lord; its vocative form is Domine, employed to address Him directly. The vocative Domine of Latin can take the English reading O Lord, with the English O being a vocative particle; or it can be read Lord, with the vocative particle omitted but understood. The final English reading below will employ the vocative particle, to match its use in the Douay Bible. The second-person singular exaudi is an imperative form; for information, its second-person plural equivalent is exaudite. Consider: exaudi (hear {thou}); exaudite (hear {you}). These imperatives derive from the present infinitive exaudire (to hear), whose lemma form is exaudio (I hear). The Latin for prayer is the feminine noun oratio; in the accusative singular, this noun takes the form orationem. In the nominative, the Latin for my prayer is oratio mea; when this falls into accusative position, as it does in the text of this verse, it takes the form orationem meam. Wherefore: Domine, exaudi orationem meam (O Lord, hear my prayer).

Polish. Usłysz, o Panie, moją modlitwę. The masculine noun Pan (nominative) is Polish for Lord; its vocative form is Panie, employed to address Him directly. Panie is here accompanied by the Polish vocative particle o. The second-person singular usłysz is an imperative form; for information, its second-person plural equivalent is usłyszcie. Consider: usłysz (hear {thou}); usłyszcie (hear {you}). These imperatives derive from the perfective infinitive usłyszeć (to hear). The Polish for prayer is the feminine noun modlitwa; in the accusative singular, this noun takes the form modlitwę. In the nominative, the Polish for my prayer is moja modlitwa; when this falls into accusative position, as it does in the text of this verse, it takes the form moją modlitwę. Wherefore: Usłysz, o Panie, moją modlitwę (hear, O Lord, my prayer).

Friulian. Signôr, scolte la mê preiere. The masculine noun Signôr is Friulian for Lord. Given that Signôr is here employed vocatively, which is to say, it is used to address Him directly, the final English reading below will employ O Lord, using the English vocative particle O, to match the use of the Douay Bible; the reader will note that Friulian also knows this vocative particle, and the wording o Signôr is possible in Friulian. The second-person singular scolte is an imperative form; for information, its second-person plural equivalent is scoltait. Consider: scolte (hear {thou}); scoltait (hear {you}). These imperatives derive from the infinitive scoltâ (to hear). The Friulian for prayer is the feminine noun preiere, whence la mê preiere for equivalent of my prayer. Wherefore: Signôr, scolte la mê preiere (O Lord, hear my prayer).