Cuius es filia?

At Genesis 24:23, Abraham’s servant asks Rebekah: Whose daughter art thou? (version Douay). This entry will examine how Latin, Polish and Friulian have this same question expressed. Latin. Cuius es filia? The Latin cuius means whose. For instance, had the servant simply asked whose art thou?, the question could have been put cuius es?, with es being the second-person singular of the present indicative of … Continue reading Cuius es filia?

Dabit vobis Dominus vespere carnes edere

At Exodus 16:8, Moses says to the children of Israel: In the evening the Lord will give you flesh to eat, and in the morning bread to the full. This entry will examine how Latin, Polish and Friulian have the first half of the words of Moses rendered, which is to say, in the evening the Lord will give you flesh to eat. Latin. Dabit … Continue reading Dabit vobis Dominus vespere carnes edere

Biblical phrases in Latin, Polish, Friulian

By clicking on the Latin biblical phrases in the table below, the reader may consult the language notes related to the Latin, Polish and Friulian. Whenever a new entry on a biblical phrase is published, the phrase will be added to this table. Source of the phrases: Latin, Biblia Vulgata; Polish, Biblia Tysiąclecia, Biblia poznańska; Friulian, Bibie par un popul; English, Douay Bible. LATIN POLISH … Continue reading Biblical phrases in Latin, Polish, Friulian

Quo vadis?

At Genesis 32:18, the question whither goest thou? (version Douay) is found. This entry will examine how such question is expressed in Latin, Polish and Friulian. Latin. Quo vadis? For whither, the Latin is quo. As for vadis, this is a second-person singular form meaning thou goest, whose present infinitive is vadere (to go). Following is the entire conjugation of this verb in the present … Continue reading Quo vadis?

Adhuc pater meus vivit?

Joseph, at Genesis 45:3, in making himself known to his brothers, asks of them: Is my father yet living? (version Douay). This entry will examine Joseph’s question in Latin, Polish and Friulian versions, with verses 1-3 provided after the notes. Latin. Adhuc pater meus vivit? The Latin adhuc in the context of Joseph’s question means still, yet, even now. Pater is a masculine noun meaning … Continue reading Adhuc pater meus vivit?

Simile est regnum caelorum thesauro abscondito in agro

At Matthew 13:44, Jesus tells such parable (version Douay): The kingdom of heaven is like unto a treasure hidden in a field. Which a man having found, hid it; and for joy thereof goeth and selleth all that he hath and buyeth that field. This entry will examine the first sentence of the parable in Latin, Polish and Friulian versions, with the entirety thereof provided … Continue reading Simile est regnum caelorum thesauro abscondito in agro

Prope est dies Domini

This entry will examine the Latin, Polish and Friulian equivalents of the wording the day of the Lord is near; such words can be found at Isaiah 13:6. Latin. Prope est dies Domini. The Latin prope means near, nigh. The third-person singular est is the Latin equivalent of is. As for the day of the Lord, the Latin is dies Domini, where Domini (of the … Continue reading Prope est dies Domini

Quis fecit os hominis?

Moses, at Exodus 4, in shrinking before the Lord in the mission given him, uses as pretext his lack of eloquence, his slowness of tongue. The Lord, for whom nothing is impossible, puts forth to Moses the following question (version Douay-Rheims): Who made man’s mouth? This entry will examine the words of the Lord in Latin, Polish and Friulian versions. Latin. Quis fecit os hominis? … Continue reading Quis fecit os hominis?