On the comparative and superlative of Polish adjectives

The comparative form of a Polish adjective is this which equates to the -er form of an English adjective (richer, younger, stronger), whereas the superlative equates to the -est form (richest, youngest, strongest). Take, for instance, the Polish adjective bogaty (rich); this is its masculine nominative form. By replacing -y with -szy, the comparative is obtained: bogatszy (richer). By adding the prefix naj- to the … Continue reading On the comparative and superlative of Polish adjectives

Jezus – the name of Jesus in Polish

The name of our Lord Jesus in the Polish language is Jezus. His name is declinable in Polish, meaning that its form must change in accordance with how it is used grammatically. This entry will help the reader to understand what these different forms are and when they are used. Nominative – JEZUS The nominative form of our Lord’s name is Jezus; this is the … Continue reading Jezus – the name of Jesus in Polish

On telling the time in Polish

Która godzina? (What time is it?). The noun godzina (hour) is feminine; to state the hour, Polish ordinal numerals are employed in their feminine nominative position. For instance, it is one o’clock in Polish is jest pierwsza godzina (literally, it is the first hour). So as hour may be omitted in English, godzina may be omitted in Polish; the Polish ordinal remains feminine in form. … Continue reading On telling the time in Polish

On telling the date in Polish (months, days, ordinals)

This entry presents basic information on telling the date in Polish. The reader may look to the example sentences provided to make sense of which forms to use. Note: Ordinal numerals in both nominative and genitive position up to thirty-first are presented at the end of this post, for the reader’s reference. Miesiące roku Months of the year nominative genitive January (I) styczeń (m.) stycznia … Continue reading On telling the date in Polish (months, days, ordinals)

On counting in Polish (ordinal numerals)

Polish ordinal numerals (first, second, third, etc.) are listed below, in masculine form. 1. pierwszy (first) 2. drugi (second) 3. trzeci (third) 4. czwarty (fourth) 5. piąty (fifth…) 6. szósty 7. siódmy 8. ósmy 9. dziewiąty 10. dziesiąty 11. jedenasty 12. dwunasty 13. trzynasty 14. czternasty 15. piętnasty 16. szesnasty 17. siedemnasty 18. osiemnasty 19. dziewiętnasty 20. dwudziesty 21. dwudziesty pierwszy 22. dwudziesty drugi 23. … Continue reading On counting in Polish (ordinal numerals)

On counting in Polish (cardinal numerals)

Polish cardinal numerals (one, two, three, etc.) are listed below. 0 zero (nought) 1 jeden (one) 2 dwa (two) 3 trzy (three) 4 cztery (four) 5 pięć (five…) 6 sześć 7 siedem 8 osiem 9 dziewięć 10 dziesięć 11 jedenaście 12 dwanaście 13 trzynaście 14 czternaście 15 piętnaście 16 szesnaście 17 siedemnaście 18 osiemnaście 19 dziewiętnaście 20 dwadzieścia 21 dwadzieścia jeden 22 dwadzieścia dwa 23 … Continue reading On counting in Polish (cardinal numerals)

On the declension of Polish possessive pronouns

Two declensions are possible for certain possessive pronouns below: the forms in grey are variants. Contents: 1. Declension of mój 2. Declension of twój 3. Declension of swój 4. Declension of nasz 5. Declension of wasz Abbreviations: acc., accusative; anim., animate; dat., dative; f., feminine; gen., genitive; inan., inanimate; instr., instrumental; loc., locative; m., masculine; n., neuter; nom., nominative; pers., personal; voc., vocative. 1. Declension … Continue reading On the declension of Polish possessive pronouns