On the Friulian imperative (conjugation I verbs)

This entry will examine how the imperative of Friulian verbs of the first conjugation is formed. First conjugation verbs are those whose infinitive ends in -â, for instance, fevelâ (to speak), cjaminâ (to walk), cjapâ (to take). The formation of the imperative of verbs of the second, third and fourth conjugations must be dealt with in subsequent entries. Related reading: Formation of the negated Friulian … Continue reading On the Friulian imperative (conjugation I verbs)

On the contraction of the Friulian INDI

The Friulian indi means thereof. In the spoken language, but also in written texts, indi undergoes contraction. The reader will rarely encounter the full form indi, so much so that even the text of the Bible in Friulian prefers the contracted forms. This entry will examine some of the contractions of indi to be encountered by the reader in the contemporary translation of the Bible … Continue reading On the contraction of the Friulian INDI

On the pronunciation of the Friulian Ç

The sound of the Friulian ç is, after the English manner, that of ch in the English words church, child, chapter. Should the Friulian ç occur before a vowel, it will only come before a, o or u, and never before e or i, the reason for which is explained at the end of this entry; the Friulian ç will also appear at the end … Continue reading On the pronunciation of the Friulian Ç

On the negated imperative in Friulian

By the term ‘negated imperative’, the reader will understand such utterances as kill not, rob not, let him not speak, let us not look, and so forth. This entry will detail how to form constructions of the sort in Friulian. Second-person singular: NO STA In English, second-person singular was traditionally identified by the subject pronoun thou, employed when addressing a single person. To form a … Continue reading On the negated imperative in Friulian

On asking questions in Friulian

Here the reader will find numerous instances of questions put in Friulian, with a translation into English. Observed in the English renderings below is the traditional distinction between thou (second-person singular) and you (second-person plural), that the reader may eliminate all doubt in his mind as to which form he is dealing with in the Friulian. General questions Âstu ancjemò pôre? Hast thou yet fear? … Continue reading On asking questions in Friulian

How to learn the Friulian language online

The reader will find below different resources available online which he may use to learn the Friulian language on his own. What does Friulian sound like? Categories below include: Friulian courses Friulian dictionaries Friulian grammar, spelling and phonetics Read in Friulian Listen to Friulian Friulianisms used in Italian Friulian courses Mandi (mitrigotart.it) An introductory course to Friulian, by Mitri Gotart, in the format of a … Continue reading How to learn the Friulian language online

On counting in Friulian (cardinal numerals)

The reader will find Friulian cardinal numerals listed below. 0 zero 1 un 2 doi 3 trê 4 cuatri 5 cinc 6 sîs 7 siet 8 vot 9 nûf 10 dîs 11 undis 12 dodis 13 tredis 14 cutuardis 15 cuindis 16 sedis 17 disesiet 18 disevot 19 disenûf 20 vincj 21 vincjeun 22 vincjedoi 23 vincjetrê 24 vincjecuatri 25 vincjecinc 26 vincjesîs 27 vincjesiet … Continue reading On counting in Friulian (cardinal numerals)

On Friulian personal pronouns

This entry presents a summary of Friulian pronouns used as direct and indirect objects. For instance, me is the direct object in the English he will kill me; in Friulian this is expressed as lui mi coparà. Them is the direct object in the English God blessed them; in Friulian, this is expressed as Diu ju benedì. On the other hand, in the Friulian lui … Continue reading On Friulian personal pronouns

On Friulian possessive adjectives

This entry summarises how to say in Friulian such instances as il gno popul (my people), il to non (thy name), i tiei nemîs (thine enemies), i nestris oms (our men), lis lôr bandieris (their flags), and so forth, using possessive adjectives. The examples which appear after the table were drawn from Bibie par un popul; one example is given for each item in the … Continue reading On Friulian possessive adjectives

Present indicative of the Friulian verb VÊ

Vê is the Friulian verb for to have. In the affirmative presint indicatîf (present indicative), the tonic pronouns listed below are optional, but the atonic pronouns are mandatory and appear before the verb. For instance, I have may be expressed as jo o ài or simply o ài; thou hast may be expressed as tu tu âs or tu âs; he has may be expressed … Continue reading Present indicative of the Friulian verb VÊ