Insegnimi, Signôr, a fâ la tô volontât

In De imitatione Christi (liber III, capitulum III), Thomas a Kempis, in the words of the follower of Christ, writes: Doce me, Domine, facere voluntatem tuam, meaning teach me, Lord, to do thy will. The words doce me facere voluntatem tuam are taken from the Vulgate, Psalm 142 (143):10. This entry will examine the Friulian reading of these words, with language notes. Doce me, Domine, … Continue reading Insegnimi, Signôr, a fâ la tô volontât

Signôr, jo no soi degn de tô consolazion

In De imitatione Christi (liber III, capitulum LII), Thomas a Kempis, in the words of the follower of Christ, writes: Domine, non sum dignus consolatione tua […], meaning Lord, I am not worthy of thy consolation. In this entry, I translate these Latin words into Friulian, with usage notes on this latter language. Domine, non sum dignus consolatione tua. — De imitatione Christi (liber III, … Continue reading Signôr, jo no soi degn de tô consolazion

Domine, exaudi orationem meam

From the first verse of Psalms 143 (142): Hear, O Lord, my prayer (version Douay). Below are examined the Latin, Polish and Friulian readings of the same. Latin. Domine, exaudi orationem meam. The masculine noun Dominus (nominative) is Latin for Lord; its vocative form is Domine, employed to address Him directly. The vocative Domine of Latin can take the English reading O Lord, with the … Continue reading Domine, exaudi orationem meam

Pater, in manus tuas commendo spiritum meum

In this entry, examined are the Latin, Polish and Friulian readings of the seventh of the words of Jesus on the cross, pronounced at Luke 23:46, with such being the English reading of the Douay version: Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit. Latin. Pater, in manus tuas commendo spiritum meum. The Latin for father is the masculine noun pater (nominative); the vocative form … Continue reading Pater, in manus tuas commendo spiritum meum

Consummatum est

Examined in this entry are the Latin, Polish and Friulian readings of it is consummated (version Douay), such being the sixth of the seven final words of Jesus on the cross, pronounced at John 19:30. Latin. Consummatum est. Of the lemma form consummo (I consummate, I accomplish), the perfect passive participle is consummatus (consummated, accomplished), which, in the nominative singular, takes the following forms: consummatus … Continue reading Consummatum est

Sitio

Examined in this entry are the Latin, Polish and Friulian readings of I thirst, such being the fifth of the seven final words of Jesus on the cross, pronounced at John 19:28. Latin. Sitio. The first-person singular and present indicative sitio means I thirst, from the present infinitive sitire (to thirst). Following is the present indicative of this verb: sitio (I thirst; first-person singular); sitis … Continue reading Sitio

Deus meus, Deus meus, ut quid dereliquisti me?

At Matthew 27:46, we read (version Douay): And about the ninth hour, Jesus cried with a loud voice, saying: Eli, Eli, lamma sabacthani? That is, My God, My God, why hast thou forsaken me? At Mark 15:34, again version Douay, we also read: And, at the ninth hour, Jesus cried out with a loud voice, saying: Eloi, Eloi, lamma sabacthani? Which is, being interpreted: My … Continue reading Deus meus, Deus meus, ut quid dereliquisti me?

Mulier, ecce filius tuus; Ecce mater tua

At John 19:26-27, we read (version Douay): When Jesus therefore had seen his mother and the disciple standing, whom he loved, he saith to his mother: Woman, behold thy son. After that, he saith to the disciple: Behold thy mother. And from that hour the disciple took her to his own. This entry will examine the Latin, Polish and Friulian readings of the third of … Continue reading Mulier, ecce filius tuus; Ecce mater tua

Amen dico tibi: Hodie mecum eris in paradiso

In this entry, the reader will examine the Latin, Polish and Friulian readings of the second of the seven last words of Jesus on the cross, found at Luke 23:43 (version Douay): Amen I say to thee, this day thou shalt be with me in paradise. Latin. Amen dico tibi: Hodie mecum eris in paradiso. The Latin use of amen here equates to truly; the … Continue reading Amen dico tibi: Hodie mecum eris in paradiso